(703) 379-2475 - Office, (703) 244-6746 - Cell
4201 S. 31st Street, #110, Arlington, Virginia 22206
Photography Website: www.BainbridgeNewsPhotos.com

DOD ‘Scrubbing Money Pot’ to Reduce Furloughs, Carter Says

Compliments of:

By Karen Parrish
American Forces Press Service

Pentagon leaders from Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on down are looking for ways to reduce the pending civilian employee layoffs known as furloughs, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter said yesterday.

Under the department’s current plan, more than 700,000 civilian employees will receive furlough notices in early May notifying them of furloughs to begin in June. Furloughs would happen over seven two-week pay periods until the end of September and the close of the fiscal year, with employees likely to be told not to come to work for two days during each of those pay periods.

“I hate the idea of furlough,” Carter said during a discussion with service members and civilian employees at Scott Air Force Base, Ill.

“I think it’s outrageous. I think it’s unfair,” Carter said, noting he is planning to cut his own pay, though not his workload, commensurate with any furlough of civilian employees. As a Senate-approved presidential appointee, Carter can’t be furloughed.

“I don’t want to be collecting my whole paycheck while other people [can’t],” the deputy defense secretary added.

The sequester cuts that took effect in March will cost the department $46 billion through the end of the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30, officials have said.

Carter noted the continuing resolution Congress passed in March to fund that period gives DOD some flexibility in operations and maintenance spending. The “O and M” account, as it’s commonly known, contains funding for civilian pay as well as for training, operations at military installations and family and troop programs. After Congress acted in March, Hagel announced the department would cut the planned number of furlough days from 22 to 14.

Defense leaders are submitting a “massive reprogramming” request to Congress in response to “the idiocy of sequester,” Carter said. According to the DOD comptroller’s office, reprogramming can involve moving funds from one appropriation to another or within an appropriation, and cannot be performed without statutory authority. Carter added that he hopes Congress will “give us some additional [budget] relief of some kind” over the summer.

The deputy secretary said department leaders are focused on managing a depleted fiscal year 2013 budget as skillfully as they can.

“Of course, it’s not just to alleviate the furlough. … We have other things that are important — all these things are important,” he said. “We have to make sure our nuclear deterrent forces are at full readiness. We have to support [troops in Afghanistan]. We have to take care of wounded warriors.”

Defense leaders are looking to balance spending and “enlarge that pot,” Carter said. He added that he hopes the department can further reduce civilian furloughs.

“It’s a terrible way to treat people who are dedicated to the nation,” he said.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

About Posted by Susan Bainbridge

At age 6, Susan was destined to be a journalist and photographer. In 1980, Susan founded Bainbridge News and The Bainbridge Chronicle Newspaper. Bainbridge News specializes in Military and National Politics, including Military Funerals and Burials and Political Funerals and Burials. Susan has covered the White House, the Pentagon and Capitol Hill. She has covered every president from Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama. Recognized for her versatility, Susan has also covered finance, crime, civil rights events, marches, sports, musical events and more. In 1990, she established Bainbridge Photography, an On-Location photography company. In addition to military and political events, including Military and Political funerals and burials, Bainbridge Photography expanded into covering ALL funerals and burials, receptions, weddings, real estate, inventory, insurance, portrait, head shot, pets, fire and Hazmat. Miss Bainbridge believes in going the extra mile. "My Clients always come first." In 1980, Susan began her career in Washington, D.C., working for WMZQ Radio as a reporter and guest hostess from 1980 to 1985. Intrigued by radio, Susan wanted to write, freelancing for radio, television and print newspapers, including AP, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Northern Virginia Sun, The Press-Republicanand The Bainbridge Chronicle (established by Susan Bainbridge). In 1986, Susan worked at WDCA-TV Channel 20 as a guest hostess for "Eye On Washington." From 1990 to 1994, Susan reported and anchored for "The Arlington Weekly News." Additionally, she produced a segment for the G. Gordon Liddy Radio Show. A prolific writer, while in high school in 1977, Bainbridge wrote an episode for NBC's "Little House on The Prairie" entitled "Laura's Best Friend." Though the show's producers did not use the script then, NBC producers encouraged Susan to pursue a writing and journalism career. Susan is a member of the National Press Club, the National Press Photographer's Association and the Society of Professional Journalists. Susan Bainbridge's recognitions include from former Presidents Ronald Reagan, George Herbert Walker Bush and Bill Clinton, former First Lady Nancy Reagan, former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, the late actor Lorne Greene, among many others. BAINBRIDGE NEWS was founded in 1980 by Susan Bainbridge (a sixth generation writer), a third generation journalist, a first generation photographer and a fourth generation entrepreneur. She is the first generation to establish a news business. Bainbridge News is dedicated in honor of Miss Bainbridge's late grandfather and idol, Mark S. Watson (The Baltimore Sun editor and war correspondent from 1920 to his death in 1966).

Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.

Wordpress webhosting and development by 2by2host.com